Other

The Tres Bloody Mary


  1. Home
  2. Drink
  3. Cocktails and Spirits

4

1 rating

December 31, 2013

By

Jess Novak

This delicious, low-calorie Bloody Maria mix from Tres Agaves makes a delicious brunch drink with minimal effort.

1

Servings

457

Calories Per Serving

Related Recipes

Ingredients

  • 2 Ounces Tres Agaves tequila
  • 1 lime wedge
  • 4 Ounces Tres Agaves Organic Bloody Maria Mix

Directions

Mix ingredients in a shaker with ice. Shake, taste for balance, and strain over fresh ice. Salt or add hot sauce to preference and add a lime wedge garnish.

Nutritional Facts

Servings1

Calories Per Serving457

Sugar81gN/A

Carbs87g29%

Vitamin A0.2µgN/A

Vitamin C2mg4%

Calcium3mgN/A

Fiber6g24%

Folate (food)0.7µgN/A

Folate equivalent (total)0.7µg0.2%

Magnesium0.5mg0.1%

Phosphorus4mg1%

Potassium10mgN/A

Sodium0.7mgN/A

Sugars, added81gN/A

Have a question about the nutrition data? Let us know.

Tags


Classic Bloody Mary

This simple Bloody Mary cocktail deserves center stage on your table.

It's said that the first Bloody Mary was served by the bartender at the King Cole Bar in New York's St. Regis Hotel as early as 1934. With a base of tomato juice and full-flavor Bloody Mary ingredients, this classic cocktail is an excellent addition to any brunch recipe, sure to turn your favorite weekend meal into a party.

So how do you make one? Here's the secret: our perfect Bloody Mary recipe stars really simple and delicious ingredients. You won't find any Bloody Mary mix here. Instead, we start with tomato juice and rev up the flavor with fresh horseradish, celery seed, a dash of hot sauce and plenty of lemon juice. Another special addition: pepperoncini brine for a salty and slightly spicy bite.

The garnishes upgrade even the simplest of beverages, making this big batch drink fit for a celebration. This recipe calls for cucumber spears, stuffed olives and peppers. But if you're feeling extra festive, get creative and top with slices of bacon and celery stalks, too.

If you prefer a spicy Bloody Mary recipe, swap in a vodka distilled with hotter ingredients like habanero peppers or green chiles. Be sure to omit the hot sauce in the recipe, mix in your vodka, then give it a try! Add hot sauce only after tasting to avoid a drink that's too spicy. Some of our favorite vodkas: Hanson of Sonoma Organic Habanero Vodka and St. George Spirits Green Chile Vodka.


  1. Add celery salt to one shallow bowl and water to a second shallow bowl.
  2. Dip the rim of the glasses in the water, then in the salt.
  3. Fill glasses over halfway with ice.
  4. Add the vodka and Clamato or V8 juice.
  5. Add 2-4 dashes of hot sauce (more if you like it spicy) and 2-3 dashes of Worcestershire sauce and stir.
  6. Add a big squeeze of lime.
  7. You may like some A1 sauce or for a spicier version add some horseradish and dijon mustard. Add a dash of pickle juice for great flavor.
  8. Add a celery stick and meat stick or choice of meat to each drink.
  9. Using the cocktail picks add your favorite items for your drink.

It’s best not to shake a Bloody Mary. If using a shaker, just turn it over a few times.

You can make a pitcher by multiplying the number of drinks you want to make by the ingredient measurements. On the recipe card below, slide the servings bar to adjust the measurements automatically.

A Bloody Mary is not an “after dark” drink, but rather a day drink and can even be consumed in the morning as a “cure” for a hangover.

Whether it’s to cure a hangover, or hosting a breakfast or brunch with friends, this Bloody Mary recipe with its variety of amazing toppings really hits the spot.


What kind of dishes do you serve the Bloody Mary Obsessed style refried beans with?

There are a lot of breakfast and brunch dishes you can serve these Bloody Mary Obsessed style refried beans from scratch with. You can even serve them at dinner with any dish you’d serve rice and beans with and you can also make them super creamy and cheesy and use as a dip with tortilla chips. The most popular dishes to serve these refried beans with would be chilaquiles, huevos rancheros, inside breakfast burritos, breakfast enchiladas, omelets, and so on.

Of course, don’t forget to use that extra bloody mary mix, now that you’ve opened a bottle up to mix some bloody marias or micheladas to go with your brunch or breakfast!


Easy Bloody Mary Mix

Sign up for our newsletter to receive the latest tips, tricks, recipes and more, sent twice a week.

By signing up, you agree to our Terms of Use and acknowledge the data practices in our Privacy Policy. You may unsubscribe at any time.

This Bloody Mary mix sticks to the basics: tomato juice, horseradish, hot sauce, celery salt, and Worcestershire sauce. It makes a balanced drink with citrusy brightness and a little heat. If you’re the type who treats your Mary as a pre-brunch snack, load up on garnishes like olives, pickles, celery, or pickled prawns. It’s best to make the mix the night before you want to serve it so the flavors can meld, then just add vodka and serve.


Preparation

Step 1

Combine tomato juice, pickle juice, lemon juice, horseradish, hot sauce, Worcestershire sauce, salt, pepper, celery seeds, and cayenne in a large pitcher. Cover and chill at least 8 hours.

Step 2

Just before serving, stir vodka into tomato base and pour into tall ice-filled glasses. Garnish each with a celery stalk and a lemon wedge.

Step 3

Do Ahead: Tomato base can be made 4 days ahead keep chilled.

How would you rate New-New Bloody Mary?

Too much pickle juice. I don’t think a Bloody Mary should make you pucker up.

Recipes you want to make. Cooking advice that works. Restaurant recommendations you trust.

© 2021 Condé Nast. All rights reserved. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement and Your California Privacy Rights. Bon Appétit may earn a portion of sales from products that are purchased through our site as part of our Affiliate Partnerships with retailers. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. Ad Choices


Best for Travel: W&P Carry on Cocktail Kit

Excellent for bloody marys on the go

Kit relies on how stocked a plane bar is

Never settle for a plane bloody mary again. This kit contains everything you need to craft a great on-the-go bloody mary, including a teeny bar spoon, bloody mary mix, rimming salt, and a linen coaster all packed into a TSA-approved tin. Just add the mix to alcohol in a glass with ice. If there's lime available on the drinks cart, you can use it to rim the glass beforehand.

This premium bloody mary mix—enough for two cocktails—is made with tamarind, shallots, horseradish, red pepper sauce, celery seed, and spices. It’s packed in a small container compact enough to be tossed into your carry-on luggage. Planes aside, pack this kit for park hangouts or train travel for stellar drinks on the fly. All you need is ice and mini bottles from your favorite liquor store.


Frozen Bloody Mary

I’m not sure I’ve mentioned this before, but I worked at a cozy college bar called “The Library” for a couple of years. It’s a small bar with a large, shaded patio—the perfect place to go for good conversation and cheap drinks. While I was working there, I learned which beers I liked amongst our 32 taps and developed a taste for olives and bloody marys.

Even before I learned to love bloody marys, I noticed that I’d wake up after a boozy night with a vicious craving for something tomato-y. Most people crave fried foods when they’re hungover, but I’ve always wanted tomato soup, ketchup, marinara sauce or salsa in a bad way. I finally discovered that lycopene, which is a powerful antioxidant that accumulates in the liver, is found in its highest concentrations in cooked tomato products. I have a hunch that bloody marys are the most popular drink for hangovers because of the lycopene and other vitamins present in tomato juice. It’s like a mind/body compromise—temporary liquor-induced headache relief comes along with the vitamins and nutrients needed for true recovery.

That being said, a fresh bloody mary made with high quality ingredients is going to do you a lot more good than one made with a cheap mix. One day while bartending, I happened to glance at the nutrition facts on our bloody mary mix, which is called Zing Zang. I was bummed when I saw that my preferred mix contained junk like hydrolyzed soy, MSG and preservatives.

I’ve since tried making my own bloody marys at home, but V8 was too watery and fresh tomatoes weren’t flavorful enough to stand on their own. The most important ingredient, I’ve learned, is great tomato juice. I recently discovered the R.W. Knudsen brand of organic juice and fell head over heels for it.

I found this recipe while flipping through the August issue of Martha Steward Living. Instead of mixing tomato juice with ice, you blend it with frozen tomato. Genius, right?! The frozen tomatoes lend it a thicker viscosity, and there’s no ice to water it down. It’s absolutely worth the effort.


How To Make A Bloody Mary 2021

How To Make A Bloody Mary. However, a bloody mary is one of the more restorative options in the cocktail world and the flavours are definitely cheering if you feel a bit jaded. Adding a touch of agave syrup can bring the tomatoes back to life.

how to make a bloody mary, Image source from www.pinterest.com

The peppery middle eastern paste adds smoky sweetness. In a large pitcher combine tomato juice, vodka, pickle juice, lemon juice, horseradish, worcestershire sauce, hot sauce, and celery seeds.

Bloody Mary Vodka Infusion Beverage Food And Infused Vodka

Adjust the mix depending on how. Make this recipe today for yourself or a group of friends.

Pin on random stuff i likebe it color item. However, a bloody mary is one of the more restorative options in the cocktail world and the flavours are definitely cheering.

Pin on bloody mary. Adding a touch of agave syrup can bring the tomatoes back to life.

Pin on bloody mary. The peppery middle eastern paste adds smoky sweetness.

Pin on bloody mix recipes. In a large pitcher combine tomato juice, vodka, pickle juice, lemon juice, horseradish, worcestershire sauce, hot sauce,.

Pin on bloody mix recipes. Adjust the mix depending on how.

Pin on drinks. Make this recipe today for yourself or a group of friends.

How To Make A Bloody Mary 2021

Bartenders generally season the drink with celery salt, kosher salt, and black pepper, and finish it with a garnish of green olives, a celery stick, and a.For the bloody mary, you’ll need a highball or pint glass.A good bloody mary starts with the tomato base, which should be savory, tangy, and a little spicy.Stir until the outside of the jug feels cold, then strain the cocktail into 2 tall glasses.

This will soon become your favourite brunch cocktail.Make this recipe today for yourself or a group of friends.In the words of greenday’s mike dirnt, “sometimes you need coffee, and sometimes you need a bloody mary.” but don’t limit your options:Good, reliable formula for a basic bloody mary, just waiting for your own personal spin and additions, whether it's horseradish, clamato, steak seasoning, lemon pepper, old bay or beef broth, any number of which we've tried.

This is a good drink for making in large batches to share with friends or pop in the fridge for later.While you're switching up your bloody mary routine, consider adding tequila to a crazy bloody mary.Top up with fresh ice, add a celery stick and lemon slice to both glasses and enjoy.The drink is completely adaptable to suit your personal taste

My mom is a hilarious, witty, and extremely serious about her bloody mary recipe!Let me set the record straight!Add 1 cup vodka, 4 cups tomato juice, 1/4 cup lemon juice, 2 tablespoons lime juice, 1 tablespoon worcestershire sauce, 2 teaspoons prepared horseradish if desired, 1/2 teaspoon celery salt, 1/2 teaspoon pepper and 1/2 teaspoon hot pepper sauceThis allows your brunch buddies to customize their tipple and keeps the vodka and tomato mixture from separating.


A Bloody Mary Mix That Is as Good Virgin as It Is Spiked

When I was a kid, our family used to go to the West Amwell Fire Company chicken dinner every summer. It was advertised for weeks on a big letter-board sign planted in the cornfields along Route 179, and we passed it in the car with building excitement. On the June day, the firefighters rolled up the gates of the bays and set up long folding tables where the trucks were usually parked. The wives made cakes and the men worked immense charcoal fires walled in with cinder blocks and covered with metal grates where they basted the halved chickens by the hundred. You bought your ticket and stood in line, and when a spot opened up at one of the tables, you were seated. And there you ate a community supper, raising money for the volunteer fire company, flanked by what seemed to me a lot of old people and a lot of young parents while all the kids raced in and out, like hummingbirds docking for a few seconds at a juicy flower before zipping away again.

I love a community meal. Back then, there was a ham supper at the Methodist church in New Hope that I was so fond of that I asked for it to be my birthday dinner one year (even though it came with dreaded lima beans), and an epic lobster fest at the Episcopalian church across from my elementary school that was so popular you had to reserve a spot as soon as it was announced. It was a day for blazers and floral prints, and everybody from every part of small-town life came.

Was it the era or the region that had those suppers commence with a Dixie cup of tomato juice, set down on your plate? Just a little shot to get you started, served in a small wax-coated cup hardly bigger than the one used at the dentist’s office when they ask you to rinse. Whether what followed was chicken and corn on the cob or ham and lima beans, it started with the tomato juice.

It felt like a little Communion before supper, which even a person like me — with no church or any religion in her household — was allowed to participate in. I’ve started every Thanksgiving dinner for the past 20 years by serving a small glass of cold, salted tomato juice in that very same spirit.

Tomato juice doctored up with horseradish and lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce, Tabasco brand hot sauce and ground black pepper is obviously the beginning of a Bloody Mary, that famous brunch cocktail, which when garnished with its customary celery branch and a couple of pimento-stuffed olives becomes nearly a meal in itself. But a chilled bolt of the stuff on its own, without vodka — zingy from the lemon juice and lively with the heat from Tabasco — makes for a convincing, modest appetizer. Bloody Mary mix — virgin — is what I order on an airplane, on those late-afternoon return flights, when once back on the ground there will be work waiting for me and much to still accomplish. It wakes me up and holds me over until dinner. And Bloody Mary mix — properly spiked — is what I order on those exuberant outbound flights to vacation, when you are giddy to be getting away from all the work and obligations, and where there will be nothing that needs doing when you land except to unpack your bikini.

There was a “swimsuit” diet for the ladies of my mom’s era involving a glass of tomato juice and a scoop of cottage cheese for lunch, which she never had use for but which my dad followed for decades — subbing clamato juice — when he was trying to get into his ski pants each season. I gave a nod to him and his love of clamato juice on our brunch Bloody Mary menu (11 different Bloody Marys with their individual garnishes), using gin and clam juice and garnished with half a pickled egg, which I called a Bloody Caesar. That was a tasty one, for sure. There was also the Danish Mary, with aquavit and a fresh branch of fennel, and another with tequila and a hit of smoky chipotle in adobo called the Southwest. But all 11 used this same base recipe here. It has all the necessary body from the tomato juice, but we use so much lemon juice that it remains clean and bright, never getting thick or muddy. The “gourmets” often insist on grated fresh horseradish root, but I’ve noticed that the fresh stuff loses its kick almost immediately, and then you end up with bits of flavorless pencil shavings clogging up the glass, while prepared horseradish holds its bite just about forever, and the gratings remain fresh and moist, pleasant to chew. Worcestershire brings depth to the umami already inherent in tomato, and Tabasco — the most perfectly acidic of hot pepper sauces — brings the whole thing to life.

Several years ago during the modernist-cuisine apex, there was an obsession with tomato water in general, but my good friend and chef Michael Schlow brilliantly took the technique — long, slow straining of fresh tomato pulp through several layers of cheesecloth — from the kitchen to the bar at his restaurant Great Bay in Boston, and introduced a cocktail called the Ghost of Mary. What a miracle! Clear as a martini — yes, clear! — with the full-on flavors of a Bloody Mary. You prepare the Bloody Mary mix as usual but then let it drip for hours through the thick filter of cheesecloth until you are left with a liquid that has all the flavor and none of the pulp or color. Mixed with vodka for a martini, you taste everything there: the horseradish and the lemon and the tomato and the pepper and the Worcestershire, without a speck of texture.

But the greater miracle is that a simple glass of juice — no straining required! — can be such a remarkable workhorse. It’s breakfast, lunch and brunch, as welcome at an early church supper as it is at an evening cocktail hour.
Recipe: Bloody Mary Mix


Watch the video: BLOODY MARY. Complete PMV MAP BloodGore Warning (December 2021).